Somewhat Ephemeral
Rod.21.Gallery, Things I like and Inspire me.
Somewhat Ephemeral
+
+

Hamersley Road Residence | © | HC
+
nevver:

‘Shrooms
+
creatio-ex-materia:

2013-04-25_1366870489 (by Dov neon)
+

henrietta hellberg for vision china, jun 14

henrietta hellberg for vision china, jun 14
+
graphitedoll:


"True Love comes in many forms"

since i’ve equated a few of my favorite dreamworks movies to celestial bodies, i wanted to do something similar with a few disney/pixar movies that i love and love seems to be just the right theme !!
remember to buy gifts for your mom! there’s only 1 week left to prepare !!
graphitedoll:


"True Love comes in many forms"

since i’ve equated a few of my favorite dreamworks movies to celestial bodies, i wanted to do something similar with a few disney/pixar movies that i love and love seems to be just the right theme !!
remember to buy gifts for your mom! there’s only 1 week left to prepare !!
graphitedoll:


"True Love comes in many forms"

since i’ve equated a few of my favorite dreamworks movies to celestial bodies, i wanted to do something similar with a few disney/pixar movies that i love and love seems to be just the right theme !!
remember to buy gifts for your mom! there’s only 1 week left to prepare !!
graphitedoll:


"True Love comes in many forms"

since i’ve equated a few of my favorite dreamworks movies to celestial bodies, i wanted to do something similar with a few disney/pixar movies that i love and love seems to be just the right theme !!
remember to buy gifts for your mom! there’s only 1 week left to prepare !!
graphitedoll:


"True Love comes in many forms"

since i’ve equated a few of my favorite dreamworks movies to celestial bodies, i wanted to do something similar with a few disney/pixar movies that i love and love seems to be just the right theme !!
remember to buy gifts for your mom! there’s only 1 week left to prepare !!
+
opticoverload:

Lava Below, Stars Above
+
zeroing:

Gunnar Gestur Geirmundsson
+
lovelaceleopard:

whoseddy:

x

love lace leopard <3
+
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago
wingofablueroller:

Terunobu Fujimori – Takasugi-an (2004)
"Terunobu Fujimori is perhaps one of the more academic architects working in Japan today, both conceptually and in practice. He has been deeply influenced by the tea house, which makes him a perfect subject as we wind down our discussion. In 2004 Fujimori completed a tea house titled Takasugi-an (高過庵), literally “too tall hermitage.” Firmly footed in the teachings of Rikyu, the interior is anything but spacious and is composed of humble materials like plaster and bamboo mats. Although Rikyu preferred the even smaller 2-mat space for floor area, Fujimori went with the iconic yojohan (4.5 tatami mats); just enough space for 2 guests to sit (but not stand!) Here is where, visually, the similarities cease and Fujimori’s tea house diverges from tradition. The house was erected upon 2 trees that were cut and brought in from a nearby mountain. In order to reach the room, guests must climb up the freestanding ladders propped up against the tree. And therein lies the genius of Fujimori’s work. Using paradox to guide the consciousness of his guests, he takes them from an exhilarating climb to a serene and spiritual setting high above ground." Source: Spoon & Tamago